A Magazine by the Society of Professional Journalists



June 30th, 2006 • Quill Archives
SDX Awards: Newspaper non-deadline reporting, over 100,000

For the first time in her journalistic career, all Liz Bowie had to do was watch. He lingered hour after hour, day after day, on a basketball court jammed between a fast-food joint and a drug rehab center. Others came and went for a few games before moving on.


June 30th, 2006 • Quill Archives
SDX Awards: Art/Graphics, photography features

The images published in the Commercial Appeal’s “Born to Die” series awoke a sleeping community to an alarming problem. They also caused photographer Karen Pulfer Focht many restless nights. “I have three children of my own,” said Focht. “I would often come home at night and hold them tight.


June 30th, 2006 • Quill Archives
SDX Awards: TV documentaries, other markets

Instead of scouring for what’s broken in today’s public schools, “Making Schools Work,” a documentary devised by South Carolina Educational Television, stresses the positive and gives teachers something to work with instead of just heaping more criticism on an underappreciated profession.


June 30th, 2006 • Quill Archives
SDX awards: Newspaper non-deadline reporting, under 100,000

In an article called “The Speculators,” reporting done by the staff of the East Valley Tribune was so thorough, there was no room for conjecture. Reporter Mark Flatten spearheaded the effort and wrote the story, one that combined extensive research and stellar storytelling to paint a clear picture of who really controlled the territory in Mesa, Ariz.,


June 30th, 2006 • Quill Archives
SDX Awards: Art/Graphics, sports photography

Dan Hubbell has been a photographer for the Professional Rodeo Cowboys Association since 1990. He’s snapped more than 600,000 shots of man battling beast in arenas full of dirt. But the photo he took of cowboy Kyle Whitaker tumbling off the aptly named Dump Wagon was one of a kind.


June 30th, 2006 • Quill Archives
SDX Awards: TV public service, network/Top 25 markets

KTTV Fox 11 reporter Christine Devine has good reason to trust in the newscast’s “Wednesday’s Child” segments. “What keeps me believing in the children and adoption?” Devine said. “My little sister from Vietnam. The little girl who once followed me around the house, mimicking every move.


June 30th, 2006 • Quill Archives
SDX Awards: Newspaper investigative reporting, over 100,000

“Toxic Legacy” had all the drama of a Hollywood script. The scary part: every word of it was true. “Given the complexity of tracking so many disparate story lines — it was as if the writers for The Sopranos and Erin Brockovich got together — the team delivered a clear and cogent indictment of one of the most powerful companies in America,” said Editor Frank Scandale of The Record.


June 30th, 2006 • Quill Archives
SDX Awards: Art/Graphics, editorial cartooning

The numbers don’t seem to add up. Twelve hours of work scribbling 2,000 names yielded only three alphabetic letters and one question for editorial cartoonist Mike Luckovich. One could question how this is possible, but he would be better served inquiring why.


June 30th, 2006 • Quill Archives
SDX Awards: TV public service, other markets

Through their “Troubled Ten” series, reporter Dedrick Russell and the staff of WBTV News in Charlotte, N.C., demonstrated their dedication to education. “It is unusual for a television station to have such a deep commitment to education, but we believe one of the most important issues facing our viewers is their children’s education,” said WBTV in its letter to the judges.


June 30th, 2006 • Quill Archives
SDX Awards: Newspaper investigative reporting, less than 100,000

Imagine being locked in jail, just because a scientist mislabeled a test tube. It happened to Leslie Lincoln, and the Winston-Salem Journal bailed her out. Lincoln’s story was the first part of reporter Phoebe Zerwick’s series “Crime and Science: The weight of evidence.”


June 30th, 2006 • Quill Archives
SDX Awards: Art/Graphics, photo illustration

Bruce Ely’s photo illustration gives new meaning to an old basketball cliche about saying that a player who hustles is “all over the court.” While no player has ever literally been in different places on the floor at the same time, The Oregonian photojournalist’s “The Omnipresent Damon” gave basketball fans a chance to see what that might look like.


June 30th, 2006 • Quill Archives
SDX Awards: Online, deadline reporting, affiliated

During the murder trial of Joseph P. Smith, HeraldTribune.com kept the city of Sarasota, Fla., connected. “HeraldTribune.com became a place for the community to learn about the case and discuss what they discovered,” said Lucas Grindley, content manager of HeraldTribune.com. “A prominent tease on the home page asked readers to participate in a message board that grew to more than 500 posts.


June 30th, 2006 • Quill Archives
SDX Awards: Newspaper feature writing, over 100,000

The sound of the crash was like heavy metal doors slamming shut on the pre-dawn stillness. BANG! … BANG! … BANG! And then the morning silence returned. Within that flash of time on a two-lane Osceola Country road, the destinies of six people collided with a force that still reverberates more than three years later.


June 30th, 2006 • Quill Archives
SDX Awards: Art/Graphics, informational graphics

When Pope John Paul II died, the Los Angeles Times relied on its graphics staff to make the major metropolitan periodical’s coverage a work of art. “We were dealing with a breaking news story that was covered by newspapers, magazines and TV stations around the world, and it was a challenge to differentiate our coverage from what people would see elsewhere,” said Les Dunseith, graphics editor of the Times.


June 30th, 2006 • Quill Archives
SDX Awards: Research

Sure, journalists aren’t immune to error. But are we actually mistake-prone? According to a study by University of Oregon associate professor Scott R. Maier and University of North Carolina Knight Chair and professor Philip Meyer, journalists aren’t practicing what they preach about accuracy.


June 30th, 2006 • Quill Archives
SDX Awards: Newspaper Washington Correspondence

Like thousands of his fellow veterans of America’s wars, Alfred Brown died waiting. In 1945, when he was a 19-year-old soldier fighting in Italy, shrapnel from an enemy shell ripped into his abdomen. His wounds were so severe that he was twice administered last rites.