A Magazine by the Society of Professional Journalists



June 30th, 2006 • Quill Archives
SDX Awards: Newspaper deadline reporting, over 100,000

Disfigured, increasingly destitute and desperate, Bart A. Ross spent the past dozen years battling the medical and legal system, convinced he’d been wronged. The fight took the 57-year-old Polish immigrant on a revenge-seeking odyssey, culminating with the slaying of Judge Joan Lefkow’s husband and mother on Feb.


June 30th, 2006 • Quill Archives
SDX Awards: Newsletters

The story was there. Healthcare Risk Management Editor Greg Freeman just had to draw the lines. “(Freeman’s reporting) shows how enterprising journalism comes from connecting the dots and revealing the picture that appears,” said the judges. “At worst, this work reveals an attack in the works.


June 30th, 2006 • Quill Archives
SDX Awards: TV feature reporting, other markets

News 12 Westchester, N.Y., reporter Juri Tatsuuma’s feature “Domestic Violence: When Love Hurts” disrobed a social problem in an area that had been cloaked by money and material wealth. “The two-part series attempted to highlight how Westchester County, with its upscale image and affluence, was not immune to the problem of domestic violence,” said Tatsuuma.


June 30th, 2006 • Quill Archives
SDX Awards: Newspaper editorial writing, Rick Attig and Doug Bates

The sometimes disturbing film “One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest” was filmed at Oregon State Hospital. But in terms of being truly disconcerting, the fictional story is no match for one told by Rick Attig and Doug Bates about the current conditions of the decrepit asylum.


June 30th, 2006 • Quill Archives
SDX Awards: Art/Graphics, photography spot news

Without pictures, most accounts of Hurricane Katrina’s devastation would hardly seem believable. SUVs trapped in 8 feet of water on the interstate. Looters wading through downtown New Orleans streets. Morbid messages scribbled on rooftops. Anxious residents floating on mattresses and planks.


June 30th, 2006 • Quill Archives
SDX Awards: TV documentaries, network/Top 25 markets

Peter Van Sant: We are journalists from the United States. We have bought you because we want to set you free. Nicoleta: (Through translator) I thank you from the bottom of my heart. You saved me from that hell. This was the reaction of a 17-year-old girl from Bucharest that was sold to a CBS 48 Hours news team after hearing word she was now free from being a sex slave.


June 30th, 2006 • Quill Archives
SDX Awards: Newspaper non-deadline reporting, over 100,000

For the first time in her journalistic career, all Liz Bowie had to do was watch. He lingered hour after hour, day after day, on a basketball court jammed between a fast-food joint and a drug rehab center. Others came and went for a few games before moving on.


June 30th, 2006 • Quill Archives
SDX Awards: Art/Graphics, photography features

The images published in the Commercial Appeal’s “Born to Die” series awoke a sleeping community to an alarming problem. They also caused photographer Karen Pulfer Focht many restless nights. “I have three children of my own,” said Focht. “I would often come home at night and hold them tight.


June 30th, 2006 • Quill Archives
SDX Awards: TV documentaries, other markets

Instead of scouring for what’s broken in today’s public schools, “Making Schools Work,” a documentary devised by South Carolina Educational Television, stresses the positive and gives teachers something to work with instead of just heaping more criticism on an underappreciated profession.


June 30th, 2006 • Quill Archives
SDX awards: Newspaper non-deadline reporting, under 100,000

In an article called “The Speculators,” reporting done by the staff of the East Valley Tribune was so thorough, there was no room for conjecture. Reporter Mark Flatten spearheaded the effort and wrote the story, one that combined extensive research and stellar storytelling to paint a clear picture of who really controlled the territory in Mesa, Ariz.,


June 30th, 2006 • Quill Archives
SDX Awards: Art/Graphics, sports photography

Dan Hubbell has been a photographer for the Professional Rodeo Cowboys Association since 1990. He’s snapped more than 600,000 shots of man battling beast in arenas full of dirt. But the photo he took of cowboy Kyle Whitaker tumbling off the aptly named Dump Wagon was one of a kind.


June 30th, 2006 • Quill Archives
SDX Awards: TV public service, network/Top 25 markets

KTTV Fox 11 reporter Christine Devine has good reason to trust in the newscast’s “Wednesday’s Child” segments. “What keeps me believing in the children and adoption?” Devine said. “My little sister from Vietnam. The little girl who once followed me around the house, mimicking every move.


June 30th, 2006 • Quill Archives
SDX Awards: Newspaper investigative reporting, over 100,000

“Toxic Legacy” had all the drama of a Hollywood script. The scary part: every word of it was true. “Given the complexity of tracking so many disparate story lines — it was as if the writers for The Sopranos and Erin Brockovich got together — the team delivered a clear and cogent indictment of one of the most powerful companies in America,” said Editor Frank Scandale of The Record.


June 30th, 2006 • Quill Archives
SDX Awards: Art/Graphics, editorial cartooning

The numbers don’t seem to add up. Twelve hours of work scribbling 2,000 names yielded only three alphabetic letters and one question for editorial cartoonist Mike Luckovich. One could question how this is possible, but he would be better served inquiring why.


June 30th, 2006 • Quill Archives
SDX Awards: TV public service, other markets

Through their “Troubled Ten” series, reporter Dedrick Russell and the staff of WBTV News in Charlotte, N.C., demonstrated their dedication to education. “It is unusual for a television station to have such a deep commitment to education, but we believe one of the most important issues facing our viewers is their children’s education,” said WBTV in its letter to the judges.


June 30th, 2006 • Quill Archives
SDX Awards: Newspaper investigative reporting, less than 100,000

Imagine being locked in jail, just because a scientist mislabeled a test tube. It happened to Leslie Lincoln, and the Winston-Salem Journal bailed her out. Lincoln’s story was the first part of reporter Phoebe Zerwick’s series “Crime and Science: The weight of evidence.”