A Magazine by the Society of Professional Journalists


Briefs


May 21st, 2003 • Briefs
International Journalism IN-BRIEF

Uzbek authorities fire newspaper editor Authorities have ordered the editor of an independent Uzbek newspaper to resign. The move is seen by many media rights activists as renewed oppression of the free media in the Central Asian nation. Amirkul Karimov, editor of the Hurriyat newspaper, was told to leave on March 13, but he was offered a job as the head of a government fund.


May 21st, 2003 • Briefs
FOI IN-BRIEF

FOIA training video can’t be released A training video instructing staff on how to handle federal Freedom of Information Act requests has been produced by the Defense Department. The only problem with the video: It’s a secret. “It seems ironic, very ironic,” said Mike Ravnitzky, a writer for American Lawyer magazine whose November request to view the video was turned down.


May 21st, 2003 • Briefs
Ethics IN-BRIEF

AP protests FBI’s seizure of package A package mailed between two Associated Press reporters last September was opened by government agencies last September. They then seized a copy of an 8-year-old unclassified FBI lab report without notifying the news agency or obtaining a warrant.


April 29th, 2003 • Briefs
FOI IN-BRIEF

Texas city sues over disclosure order The city of Austin, Texas, is suing state Attorney General Greg Abbott over his order that Austin must comply with a University of Texas student newspaper request. The request is for information about surveillance cameras within the city.


April 29th, 2003 • Briefs
Ethics IN-BRIEF

Paper won’t call football team ‘Redskins’ The Lincoln (Neb.) Journal Star has changed part of the style found on its sports pages. The paper will no longer use the nickname “Redskins” in reference to the professional football team found in the nation’s capital.


April 29th, 2003 • Briefs
Diversity IN-BRIEF

Dallas Morning News to launch Spanish daily The Dallas Morning News will launch a Spanish-language daily for the area’s 1.4 million Hispanics. It is expected to be out in the fourth quarter of the year. The new paper – which has yet to be named – will cover local and international, business, lifestyle and sports news, and it will have a separate Web site.


April 29th, 2003 • Briefs
Journalism Education IN-BRIEF

High school considers prior review of paper Administrators at Grosse Pointe South High School have censored the school newspaper, The Tower, for the first time in its 75-year history. The censorship included the removal of a seven-line article about a fatal accident, and administrators are now considering prior review of The Tower.


April 29th, 2003 • Briefs
International Journalism IN-BRIEF

Journalist arrested over vampire story Police in Malawi have arrested and released a radio broadcaster who interviewed a man claiming to have been attacked by mysterious bloodsuckers. The bizarre rumors that the government is working with vampires to collect human blood for international aid agencies have been circulating in the impoverished southern African country since late last year.


March 27th, 2003 • Briefs
FOI IN-BRIEF

Homeland Security Office loses lawsuit The Office of Homeland Security cannot keep its activities secret, according to a federal judge, and must answer questions about the power it exerts over federal agencies. U.S. District Court Judge Colleen Kollar-Kotelly said that if the office wants the lawsuit dismissed, it must prove it has no authority, but instead only helps and advises the president.


March 27th, 2003 • Briefs
Ethics IN-BRIEF

Reporting on trash raises community stink The Willamette Week, an alternative paper in Portland, Ore., has been publishing garbage. A recent reporting trip left two journalists going through the trash of local officials and has left many readers and locals asking if the move is ethical – or even legal.


March 27th, 2003 • Briefs
Diversity IN-BRIEF

Peace activists protest Post coverage A group of activists protested outside The Washington Post offices, claiming that major corporate-owned news media in the United States are indifferent to dissent against President George W. Bush and his push for war with Iraq.


February 18th, 2003 • Briefs
FOI IN-BRIEF

TV reporter must stay 300 feet away from man A local television reporter in Florida must stay at least 300 feet from the man who claims he is being stalked by the reporter for a story, a Florida judge has ruled.


February 18th, 2003 • Briefs
Ethics IN-BRIEF

Editor fired for apology letterBrian Gomez was fired as sports editor of The State Press, the student newspaper at Arizona State University, for apologizing to university officials for an editorial the paper ran. The editorial, which ran Oct. 18, criticized a university program called the Sun Devil Recruiters.


February 18th, 2003 • Briefs
Diversity IN-BRIEF

Native publication aimed at recruitment Denny McAuliffe saw too few newspapers on reservations and tribal colleges and too few Native journalists in American newspapers. So he created reznet, an online newspaper geared toward Native Americans, at the University of Montana’s journalism school in Missoula, Mont.


February 18th, 2003 • Briefs
Journalism Education IN-BRIEF

Student scoops media with Skakel letter High school student Samanthia Ueckerman scooped reporters attempting to get prison interviews with Michael Skakel, the nephew of the late Robert F. Kennedy who was convicted in August for the 1975 beating death of Martha Moxley.


February 18th, 2003 • Briefs
International Journalism IN-BRIEF

Seven Haitian journalists in hiding Seven surviving colleagues of Brignol Lindor, a Haitian journalist hacked to death one year ago in a political attack, say they believe they are being targeted by armed government supporters. The seven journalists were in hiding Dec.